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Posts Tagged ‘David Mastovich’

How to keep a brand memorable for 100 years

Thursday, August 9th, 2012
Oreo Mars cookie

Oreo created this Mars Rover cookie, complete with Rover tracks, for a promotion.

Editor’s note: Brands are getting much cleverer in the ways they use social media and connect to major events from the Olympics to the Mars Rover landing. Marketing expert David Mastovich of MASSolutions notes that you can learn from the way successful brands leverage new media to keep a traditional brand fresh. Oreo Cookies, for instance.

By David M. Mastovich

NASA’s robotic explorer Curiosity landed on Mars Monday.

The next day, Oreo Cookie tweeted: We come in peace. With Oreo cookies. #dailytwist pic.twitter.com/8pWggzzF featuring a Mars inspired Rover cookie with red filling and little tire tracks.

The Rover isn’t a real cookie but the original certainly is. The Oreo turned 100 this year and parent company Kraft is celebrating its history and current sales levels.

The snack food industry is growing at a faster rate than other foods. Consumers are returning to iconic brands and looking for an affordable indulgence during tough economic times. But Oreo has a century long record of success based on four customer focused marketing tactics:

1. Make a Connection: We eat them as kids and then act like kids while eating them as adults. Just about everyone either loves Oreos or loves someone who does.

2. Meet Their Needs: Oreo tweaked the product to expand into 100 countries, giving each its own cookie. Green Tea Oreos in China, Trio Chocolate in Mexico and Indonesia’s Double Delight with chocolate and peanut to name a few.

3. Tailor Your Message: Oreo changes with the times. The “twist” was first promoted on trolley cars in 1923. Double Stuff Oreos hit stores in the ‘70’s. “Cookies N Cream Ice Cream” was introduced in 1983 and my personal favorite, Fudge Covered Oreos, in 1987. Reduced Fat Oreos (Really? What’s the point?) bummed fans out in the mid-90’s while bite sized Mini Oreos were part of a 2001 promotional campaign.

4. Make It Memorable: The product is memorable and so is the advertising.

Oreo adCheck out this list of slogans:
1950 – Oh-oh! Oreo
1980 – For the Kid in All of Us
1982 – America’s Best Loved Cookie
1986- Who’s The Kid with the Oreo Cookie?
1990 – Oreo, The Original Twister
2004 – Milk’s Favorite Cookie

And that’s not including the “Twist, Lick and Dunk” campaign or the recent Perfect Start to Father’s Day ad.

Add the Rover cookie celebrating NASA’s trip to Mars with millions of Facebook and Twitter followers and you have 100 years of memorable messaging leading to more than 345 billion Oreos sold since 1912. Milk’s favorite cookie indeed…and maybe the world’s too.

David MastovichDavid M. Mastovich, MBA is President of MASSolutions, an integrated marketing firm focused on improving the bottom line for clients through creative selling, messaging and PR solutions. He’s also author of “Get Where You Want To Go: How to Achieve Personal and Professional Growth Through Marketing, Selling and Story Telling.” For more information, go to www.massolutions.biz.

Can you cultivate an Apple marketing culture at your firm?

Friday, June 29th, 2012

By David M. Mastovich

Dave Mastovich

Dave M. Mastovich

Various reports have the iPad garnering 68% of tablet market sales. Those same studies show the iPad’s share of web surfing done on tablets is a whopping 91%.

Staggering statistics. But the iPad also passes the eye test. How many people do you see with iPads at work, home, the coffee shop or other places?

Yet Google’s Nexus 7 tablet introduced this week competes more with the Kindle Fire than the iPad: $199 price range, similar size and weight, both tied to the parent company’s digital multimedia content distribution service (Kindle Fire–Amazon.com, Nexus 7–Google Play).

Microsoft entered the tablet market last week with their Surface tablet. But in typical Microsoft marketing fashion, the release was muddled with pricing and shipping dates unavailable and featured two versions targeting two different markets.

The iPad is the clear tablet market leader without significant competition in sight. Apple dominates the market it created in no small part because the company’s marketing–product development, naming, introduction and rollout, advertising, PR and Social Media–continues to top the competition, even in the post-Jobs era.

While the company’s advertising the past year has not been as memorable as in the past, Apple’s product placement in movies and TV shows makes up for it.

According to Brandchannel, which tracks product appearances, iDevices appeared in more than 40% of the movies that topped the weekly box office, almost twice the penetration of the next highest brands like Dell, Chevy and Ford.

Apple’s focus on stylish, user friendly products and creative marketing continues to be a winning combination. The company’s obsessive attention to detail even included flipping the logo on Mac laptops so passersby (or TV and movie viewers) could see the logo right side up.

Not many companies will have the marketing capabilities and budget that Apple has. But, regardless of resources, you can still develop a marketing culture. First, make it about them, your target customers. Then, work to create what they want and tell them about it in multiple ways with creative and consistent messaging.

It also doesn’t hurt to create a game changing product every couple of years.

David M. Mastovich, MBA is President of MASSolutions, an integrated marketing firm focused on improving the bottom line for clients through creative selling, messaging and PR solutions. He’s also author of “Get Where You Want To Go: How to Achieve Personal and Professional Growth Through Marketing, Selling and Story Telling.” For more information, go to www.massolutions.biz.

12 marketing resolutions for 2012

Wednesday, January 4th, 2012
Dave Mastovich

Dave M. Mastovich

As we kick off 2012, MaSSolutions offers these 12 New Year’s Marketing Resolutions to help you and your company:

  • Embrace Social Media as part of your Marketing & PR strategy. Focus time on creating content relevant to your target audiences and on learning about your marketplace. Less Angry Birds and fun Facebook stuff, more content development and information gathering.
  • p,Use LinkedIn as a resource for Pre Call Prep prospecting, networking and competitive analysis. The online professional network is a must for entrepreneurs, marketers and senior leaders.
  • Build a keyword rich LinkedIn profile that tells your story and also enhances Search Engine Optimization.
  • Instead of just signing up and following celebrities on Twitter, organize your followers by category and scan for valuable content. Retweet what you think is valuable and use other information to enhance your marketing and selling efforts.
  • Develop a content strategy for Twitter. Decide what key messages you want to convey and develop a schedule to do so. Continually create an inventory of tweets to increase awareness and follower base.
  • Use Facebook for more than pushing information out. Keep abreast of what interests key target audiences and create two way conversations by asking their opinion. Make customer success stories shareable. Address negative comments quickly and honestly.
  • Contrary to what some may think, email isn’t dead and can be an important part of your marketing and selling strategy. Segment your target audiences and create email messages that show what’s in it for them.
  • Commit to staying current with Social Media tools. It doesn’t have to be a huge time investment–an hour or two a week that’s convenient to you can make a big impact.
  • The tenets of successful messaging apply to Social Media. Tell your story with clear and succinct messages that resonate with your target audiences and stay consistent with your overall brand.
  • Make customers and employees an extended part of your Marketing Team. As Social Media becomes more a part of our lives, we use our online network to share opinions quickly and easily. Manage these relationships and leverage Social Media so customers and employees spread the good, rather than bad, word about products and services.
  • Incorporate Mobile into your integrated marketing strategy. Online purchasing is moving to mobile. Google estimated 44% of last-minute holiday shopping came from smartphones or tablets. Mobile provides a great opportunity to market to unique, segmented audiences at or near their time of purchase.
  • This year, make sure you live up to your New Year’ Marketing Resolutions.

David M. Mastovich, MBA is President of MASSolutions, an integrated marketing firm focused on improving the bottom line for clients through creative selling, messaging and PR solutions. He’s also author of “Get Where You Want To Go: How to Achieve Personal and Professional Growth Through Marketing, Selling and Story Telling.” For more information, go to www.massolutions.biz.

Spend less, get more with five steps to true integrated marketing

Monday, May 9th, 2011

By David M. Mastovich

David M. Mastovich

David M. Mastovich

What do senior leaders of organizations, regardless of size or industry, think when they are asked to commit more resources to messaging and selling?

While those working in the field talk about different disciplines like Marketing, Public Relations, Sales, Communications and Advertising, decision makers tend to lump them all together and ask:

Do we really need to do that?

How much is this going to cost me?

How will we know if it is working or not?

Isn’t (Insert name of person or department) responsible for that?

Focus on ROI needed

Marketing and messaging professionals are quick to passionately explain why their recommendations are vital to the organization.  However, they often do not focus enough on the Return on Investment in terms CEO’s, entrepreneurs and CFO’s are accustomed to hearing and end up without the buy-in necessary for success.

Senior leaders also tend to lose patience with multiple departments or vendors (PR, Sales, Marketing, Corporate Communications, etc.) that rarely communicate with each other as well as they should.  Each function or area sees things in their own biased way.

Sales thinks they’re king because they bring in the business. Others find them arrogant and demanding. Advertising sees themselves as cool and full of big ideas. Others see them as full of something else. PR talks about framing the message while other departments wonder what they really do.  The list could go on and on.  The end result is a perception among senior leaders that these areas are inefficient cost centers with overlapping, duplicative efforts.

Organizations often talk about getting these departments to work together more but become frustrated with mixed results attributed to the type of work and workers involved.  Phrases like “You know those creative people,” or “He’s a marketing guy, they’re different,” are used to explain it away.

How can organizations overcome this vicious cycle of frustration?

Five Steps to Integration

Senior leaders need to champion the idea of creating a true integrated marketing and PR program and then focus on these five strategic initiatives to make it happen:

  1. Develop mutually agreed upon target markets that the organization and its messaging and selling efforts will focus on.  Far too often, target markets are described in broad or general terms.  Drill down each target audience into manageable market segments then make sure each department knows and agrees on the segmented target markets.  For example, Sales often overlooks the importance of employees as a key target market while Corporate Communications clearly sees this group as vital.  Marketing/Advertising sometimes focuses so much on the creative message but forgets that the target audience has to see or hear it when they are able and willing to buy.  Taking the time to clearly communicate information about the target market segments is the first step toward successful integration.
  2. Find out what each target market wants by asking them, through multiple channels.  While engaging a market research firm is the most formal of research methods, don’t overlook other ways to learn about target markets.  Your Sales team can ask customers and prospects what they think and track the results.  Corporate Communications should be able to easily survey employees.  Your methodology doesn’t have to be perfect.  The key takeaway is that you should ask your customers, internal and external, what they think and act accordingly.
  3. Develop a consistent message and require that each department live by it.  Be vigilant about message integrity and consistency but also be flexible. For example, your sales team isn’t going to use the slogan from your advertising all the time.  Tweak the messaging accordingly for each target market but ensure that the overall theme and key message points are still being conveyed. Consider secret shopping so that you are more aware of what your customers are really seeing and hearing.
  4. Work with each department or vendor on clearly defining their goals and the market forces that impact their ability to achieve those goals.  Develop a summary of each department or vendor’s specific roles and their strengths.  Then, convey these key points to everyone involved.  The goal is to increase the level of understanding and respect across functions.
  5. Instill a Corporate-Wide Marketing ROI focus. Challenge your marketing and messaging professionals to provide rationale in terms of Marketing ROI Success Metrics.  Ask them to work in conjunction with Finance to build the metrics.  Then, report the success metrics to leaders and managers throughout the organization.  The more everyone understands the marketing, selling and messaging goals and processes, the better.

 

Developing a true Integrated Marketing, PR and Selling program doesn’t just happen. But once you invest the time and effort, you will reap the benefits of a positive Marketing ROI.

David M. Mastovich, MBA is President of MASSolutions, Inc. With a core philosophy of integrated marketing, MASSolutions focuses on improving the bottom line for clients through creative selling, messaging and PR solutions.  In his recent book, “Get Where You Want To Go: How to Achieve Personal and Professional Growth Through Marketing, Selling and Story Telling,” Mastovich offers strategies to improve sales and generate new customers; management and leadership approaches; and creative marketing, PR and communications ideas. For more information, see: massolutions.biz.

Remember when a website was optional?

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011

By David M. Mastovich

David M. Mastovich

David M. Mastovich

Facebook accounts for 25% of all U.S. page views online.

Awareness of Twitter has exploded from 5% of Americans in 2008 to 87% now.

LinkedIn has more than 85 million users including employees from every company in the Fortune 500.

These statistics show how integral social media has become in our lives.

Do you remember when having a website was optional?  If you think about it, that wasn’t too long ago. Now we take it for granted that an organization would not only have a website, but that we would be able to find what we are looking for in a few clicks.  Yet right now, many organizations still think having a Social Media Strategy and presence is optional.

Why?

It could be because just about everyone defines “Social Media” in a different, and often narrow, way.  Instead of thinking of just Facebook or Twitter, consider the entire medium.  There really is something for everyone and that means plenty of opportunities to communicate with potential or existing customers.

Organizations could also be wary of the informality of the medium—inappropriate content, posting of pictures, obscenities, etc.  Yes, questionable content is on the internet.  But so are opportunities to engage customers and prospects and to carry on meaningful conversations. And you have more control of your Social Media presence than you might think.

Business leaders, marketers, communicators and managers should work to maximize the opportunity and make Social Media part of their marketing and messaging strategy.

Begin by developing a Social Media Plan integrated into your current Marketing, PR and Communications efforts.

Start telling your story

Then start telling your story. While Social Media is the “new, big thing,” the basic tenets of messaging still apply.  Less is still more.  Authenticity is still key.  And making it about them—your target audiences—is still what it is all about.  Tailor your Social Media message to each target audience and what they are interested in.

You can avoid Social Media and hope it goes away or you can embrace it. Just know that while you’re debating which path to choose, your competition might be tweeting to your soon to be former customers.

David Matovich’s previous piece for us: Does your business really need an app for that?

David M. Mastovich, MBA is President of MASSolutions, Inc. With a core philosophy of integrated marketing, MASSolutions focuses on improving the bottom line for clients through creative selling, messaging and PR solutions.  In his recent book, “Get Where You Want To Go: How to Achieve Personal and Professional Growth Through Marketing, Selling and Story Telling,” Mastovich offers strategies to improve sales and generate new customers; management and leadership approaches; and creative marketing, PR and communications ideas. For more information, see: massolutions.biz.

 

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